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You Are Not Allowed to Take a Nap

I'm sure our experience is similar to many other parents of young kids but I thought I'd put this video here so John can watch it 20-30 years from now when he has kids.

The (very short) backstory is that I was semi-successfully taking a nap on Sunday afternoon when Joshua (11 yrs) woke me to find out if a Minecraft book he wanted to read was available online yet, or if I could download something for him from a website. After getting some answers, he went away and then John came in to show me a picture he drew. I affirmed it was a good drawing and he went away. I turned over and tried to get a little bit more shuteye, but before long John bounds in again, which is what you see in the video below. I didn't get much rest after that, but John did succeed in getting me to play Legos with him.

Watch "You Are Not Allowed To Take A Nap" on YouTube

 

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Church Members Say the Darndest Things to Their Missionaries

guest post by Larry Dinkins

Growing up, I enjoyed a TV program called, “Kid’s Say the Darndest Things” hosted by Art Linkletter. A few of my favorites are:

What do we learn from the story of Jesus turning water into wine?
The more wine we get, the better the wedding is.

When God punished Eve, what did he make her become?
A housewife.

What ever happened to Adam and Eve?
God sent them to Hell and then transferred them to Los Angeles

 

Recently I read an article called “25 Really Strange Things Members Said to Their Pastors” on churchleaders.com. It made me think of strange things that I’ve been asked during my 37 years as a missionary to Thai people. During my mission career, church members have come up to me saying they have been following my ministry for years and would like to ask me some questions. I am pleased, of course, but many questions are so clueless that I am thinking of making a large laminated FAQ sheet with answers printed on it so I can simply point to the answers (a few of the following questions are fictitious, but most are questions I’ve been asked in all sincerity):

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Why I Love Teaching Church History on the Mission Field

Luther at the Diet of Worms, by Anton von Werner, 1877
 
As I have been visiting churches during our home assignment (furlough), I am occasionally asked why I teach church history in Thailand.  “Do they really need to learn church history?  Don’t they need the Bible more?”  The answer to both questions is , "They do."  The top priority in discipleship should be teaching the Old and New Testament, helping people to know and love their Bibles as a natural outgrowth of knowing and loving their Savior.  But in a full-orbed approach to discipleship, Christians need to know some history too… even on mission fields where Christians are few and far between.
 
As the church grows, it needs leaders who know the past in order to chart a better future.  I teach church history and missions at Bangkok Bible Seminary, a ministry training school that aims to prepare leaders for the churches in Thailand.  I love teaching there. I love helping form an upcoming generation of Thai Christian leaders.  I see students benefitting from the classes I teach and feel like I am making a real contribution.  I love seeing the lights go on in students' minds as they get their questions answered and get a better biblical grounding under their feet to minister to the people in their churches and to do outreach.  I love to read student reflections on the stories of Hudson Taylor and John Sung and the lessons they have learned from their lives.  I love to see students grasp the implications of the doctrinal debates of the early church and to discuss with them the mixed fruit arising from the legalization of Christianity under Constantine.  Did you know that the altar call is only about 200 years old?  Most of my students don’t know that coming in to my class and discussing the history of evangelistic methods gives them ideas about what they might (or might not) want to do in their own evangelism.  I love questions like...
 
“My friend said that if you worship on Sunday it is a compromise with paganism. Is that true?  I wanted to ask you since we're studying the section on the Roman Empire now”
 
“Teacher, can I get a PDF of Jonathan Edwards' sermon in Thai and English that you had us read for class. I had the opportunity to read it again. Its really good. I felt like I had to repent of a lot of things."
 
Learning church history provides my students with a multitude of benefits for their personal walk with Christ and their ministry to others.  For example,