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Bible Use
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Tag: Bible Use Ordering

Where can I buy a Thai Bible?

Where can I buy a Thai Bible?

If you are currently living in Thailand, you can order from the Thailand Bible Society (Thai Standard Version) or any Christian bookshop in Thailand (see list)

What's the difference between the different versions?  Read my article, A Brief Survey of Thai Bible Translations.

Living Outside of Thailand?

If you are living outside of Thailand, and want to buy the 2011 Thai Standard Version, you can order directly from the Thailand Bible Society in Bangkok.  They will ship internationally to you. The postage will be expensive but you'll have lots of choices in Bibles (Thai only, Thai-English, NT only, etc.).  The Thailand Bible Society produces the Thai Standard Version that is used in the majority of Thai church. To order, click here to go to the Thailand Bible Society website.

The New Thai Translation Version (NTV) is available from Kanok Bannasan (OMF Publishers Thailand), and can also be shipped internationally.  Please contact Kanok to confirm availability and pricing.  As of 2016, the NTV includes Genesis, Pslams, Proverbs, and the entire New Testament.

Alternatively, you can try ordering from a Bible society or website (such as Amazon.com) located in your home country.  I've included below links to some places in the USA and UK where hard copies of Thai Bibles can be bought, as well as links to digital versions.

In the USA

Multi Language Media and Bible in My Language both have Thai Bibles and a small selection of Thai Christian books available for ordering within the USA. 

Thai Standard Version is available from the American Bible Society

In the UK

In the UK, you can get either a full Bible or a Thai/English New Testament from the British and Foreign Bible Society.

Online

Multiple versions of the Thai Bible are available online at the YouVersion website.

The Thailand Bible Society has a Thai Bible iPhone app in the iTunes store.

The Thai Easy-to-Read New Testament is available from the Bible League International as a free download, and is also available for Android devices on the Google Play store.

The Thai New Contemporary Version (similar to the NIV) can be read online at the Biblica website.

The Thai King James Version (KJV) is available for purchase or download from Philip Pope's website.

An audio Thai Bible, a free MP3 download is available at Faith Comes by Hearing

Sola Scriptura vs Sola Experientia

Sola Scriptura vs Sola Experientia

Many Christians today use human reason to determine the meaning of their personal experiences more than they use the Bible.  Many who do so would deny that they are doing so, and often times they are aided in that claim by pastors and preachers who have torn some Bible verses out-of-context in order to “prove” that a certain experience should be validly interpreted in a certain way.  In response to this trend towards forming beliefs based on experience rather than Scripture, some other Christians raise the cry of “Sola Scriptura” (Scripture Alone), harkening back to the return to the authority and sufficiency of the Bible which was championed at the time of the Protestant Reformation.

But sadly, this call to “Sola Scriptura” is often misunderstood to mean that experience has no place in the Christian life.  That is blatantly false.  Both today and in the Scripture, experience is an essential and valid part of the Christian life.  But the value and meaning of experience all depends on what we use to interpret our experience. 

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แผนการอ่านพระคัมภีร์ของ อ.มเชย์น (M'Cheyne) และพระคัมภีร์ฉบับศึกษา ESV

แผนการอ่านพระคัมภีร์ของ อ.มเชย์น (M'Cheyne) และพระคัมภีร์ฉบับศึกษา ESV

การใช้แผนการอ่านพระคัมภีร์เป็นวิธีการอ่านพระคัมภีร์ที่มีระบบระเบียบและช่วยเราให้ไม่ละเลยการอ่านพระคัมภีร์ตอนใด ด้วยว่าเราไม่ต้องเสียเวลาในการเลือกตอนพระคัมภีร์ที่เราจะอ่านในแต่ละวัน

แผนการอ่านพระคัมภีร์ที่ท่านจะพบข้างล่างนี้ดีมากและจะเป็นประโยชน์กับผู้อ่านท่านใดที่ใช้  ดาวน์โลดได้ฟรีครับ แต่กรุณาอย่าเอาไปขายเพื่อได้กำไรอย่างใดนอกเหนือค่าถ่ายเอกสารครับ  ขอให้พระเจ้าทรงอวยพระพรครับ

 

ดาวน์โลดแผนการอ่านพระคริสตธรรมคัมภีร์ โดย ศจ. โรเบิร์ท เมอร์เรย์ มเชย์น (M'Cheyne Bible Calendar) Download M'Cheyne Bible Calendar (English)

 

ดาวน์โลดแผนการอ่านพระคริสตธรรมคัมภีร์ จากพระคัมภีร์ ESV ฉบับศึกษา (ESV Study Bible Plan) Download ESV Study Bible Reading Plan (English)

 

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ดร. ระวี ดินกินส์ เล่าเรื่องเจาะใจที่พระคริสตธรรมกรุงเทพ

ดร. ระวี ดินกินส์ มิชชันนารี OMF แบ่งปันในวันอังคารที่ 5 กุมภาพันธ์ 2013 ณ ห้องประชุมใหญ่พระคริสตธรรมกรุงเทพที่ผ่านมา (เทศนาแบบเล่าเรื่องเจาาะใจ)  การเรียนพระคัมภีร์อย่างนี้สนุกดีและช่วยผู้ฟังให้เข้าใจพระคำของพระเจ้าดีมากที่เดียว  ลองฟังดูซินะครับ  ขอพระเจ้าอวยพระพรครับ

 

 

คลิกที่นี้เพื่อดูที่ YouTube

 

Towards Contextualized Creeds

Towards Contextualized Creeds
The following article has been republished with permission from Larry Dinkins and the International Journal of Frontier Missiology.   DOWNLOAD PDF - "Towards Contextualized Creeds" by Larry Dinkins 

One of the first things our supervisor instructed us to do as church planters in Central Thailand was to glue a card with the Apostles’ Creed into the cover of every hymnal. Every Sunday we would have our small congregation of mainly leprosy believers memorize the creed and recite it in unison. Our congregation had no real appreciation of the historic development and impact of this creed, but as preferred oral learners in a group culture, they enjoyed saying the creed out loud together and in the process gained a major dose of scriptural truth. Ancient statements of faith, like the Apostles’ Creed, have been translated and used for centuries in a variety of cultures. Much ink has been spilt analyzing the contribution and content of the historic creeds, but less has been said about how to contextualize them for non-western contexts. To contextualize a creed, one must be aware of the nature of creeds historically as well as the benefits and potential pitfalls inherent in the development process.

The Value and Dangers of Creeds 

Philip Schaff in his massive three-volume work on Creeds states, “Confessions, in due subordination to the bible, are of great value and use. They are summaries of the doctrines of the Bible, aids to its sound understanding, bonds of union among their professors, public standards and guards against false doctrine and practice.”[i] G. W. Bromiley notes the benefits, but also highlights the dangers of creedal statements:

The dangers of creed making are obvious. Creeds can become formal, complex, and abstract. They can be almost illimitably expanded.  They can be superimposed on Scripture.  Properly handled, however, they facilitate public confession, form a succinct basis for teaching, safeguard pure doctrine, and constitute an appropriate focus for the church’s fellowship in faith.[ii]

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Joshua: an Aspiring Preacher?

We've been working on getting Joshua to memorize some Bible verses and catechism questions.  He is doing a decent job so far, even if he doesn't get it right all the time.  Actually, it takes quite a bit of work to get him to memorize them.  Not that he has a bad memory, but he is not always willing.  However, one day he picked up the little New Testament that was given him the last time we were in the States and did a Scripture "reading".  Multiple times over.  Amazingly, he was still doing it by the time I got the video camera out.  

 

Two small comments before you watch the video: 1) that is baby Caitlin crying in the background and yes, she is okay (Mommy is with her), and 2) Joshua's emphasis upon certain parts of John 3:16 is entirely of his own doing.  He was not coached to do that.  Might we have an aspiring preacher on our hands?

If you have trouble viewing the video above, click here to view it on YouTube.

 

Once in a Blue Moon Bible

Once in a Blue Moon Bible

guest post by Larry Dinkins There are scores of quiet time books which stress making Bible reading a daily habit: Daily Bread, Daily Light, Daily Guideposts, and a huge variety of other Daily devotional aids for every age group. I've used many of them, so I'm not sure why the title of a new devotional caught my eye - "Once-A-Day Bible". Then it dawned on me. I've been thinking about Brother Lawrence whose "Practicing the Presence of God" is still a classic after 400 years.  What if all they had in the monastery was the "Once-A-Day" Bible.  Would Brother Lawrence read his portion for the day and then say, "Ok, glad that's finished. Once in the Bible is enough for today." Mind you, a "Once-a-Day" Bible is much better than a "Once-in-Awhile"  Bible or "Once-in-a-Blue-Moon" Bible.

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How to Make Your Own Sunday School Curriculum

How to Make Your Own Sunday School Curriculum

The other day a missionary friend called me for recommendations for Sunday school curriculum in Thai that he could use for a small church plant on the outskirts of Bangkok.  There was only one that I could think of, but I didn’t know if it was in print anymore.  I was stumped for a moment.  What could I recommend to him... that was in Thai?  What do you do if you don’t have any ready-made materials to put in the hands of the Sunday school teachers at your church?  What if there just isn’t anything available?Then it dawned on me. Just tell Bible stories.  But not just any stories.  And not in any old way. Select a set of stories from the Old Testament and New Testament, and systematically work your way through the entire Bible.  And don’t just tell a story, but help the kids really learn the story and discover what it means.  Get it in their heads.  Get it in their hearts.  A couple years back, I started learning how to do Bible storytelling via Simply the Story, and ever since then I’ve been seeing ways to put it into practice all over the place.

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The Prosperity Gospel - Right Promises, Wrong Timing

The Prosperity Gospel - Right Promises, Wrong Timing

As a new believer, I learned that one of the major reasons the Pharisees opposed Jesus was because they were expecting a military and political Messiah who would conquer the Romans and physically set up the kingdom of God on earth.  But Jesus came to set up a spiritual kingdom (“The kingdom of God is within you” Luke 17:21). And that’s why there was a lot of confusion and opposition on the part of the Pharisees and other people.  At the time, that was a helpful explanation.  However, as I have continued to read and study the Bible over the years, I came to see that maybe those folks who thought Jesus came to set up a physical kingdom were not so far off.  If you read the Old Testament prophets, it often sounds like the Messiah will set up a physical kingdom where everyone will be healthy and happy.

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My Literate Bible Study with Oral Learners

My Literate Bible Study with Oral Learners

One time I was doing a Bible study in Ephesians with a Thai couple.  The wife was from Bangkok and had a bachelor’s degree in accounting.  The husband was from the countryside and had the equivalent of an associate’s degree in sculpture, or something along those lines.  As we going through chapter 5, I pointed to a verse and asked, “What does this say about Christ and the church?”  The husband looked down at his Bible briefly, then looked up and gave some general answer about Christ.  I said, “Uh, that’s true.  But what does THIS verse say?”  He looked at the Bible again, and again gave an unrelated answer from his general knowledge.  He wasn’t getting it and I didn’t know why.  It was so simple.  Just look at the verse.  It’s right there in front of you.  But, in retrospect, I was asking him to think in a way that he wasn’t use to.  I was asking him to use a type of thinking that he wasn’t use to.  He could definitely read but he wasn’t a literate thinker.  He was an oral thinker.  And I wasn’t getting through.

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Book Review: "Truth that Sticks" by Avery Willis

Book Review: "Truth that Sticks" by Avery Willis

“Truth that Sticks: How to Communicate Velcro Truth in a Teflon World” by Avery Willis and Mark Snowden (Colorado Springs: NavPress, 2010)

 

reviewed by Karl Dahlfred

As I have been learning and reading about oral Bible storying, one of the questions that has come up in my mind is, “To what extent can storying be used?  Don’t we need to use other methods too in order to bring people all the way in discipleship and leadership?”  In “Truth that Sticks”, Avery Willis and Mark Snowden have not only laid out a vision for biblical storying but have also explained how it connects with discipleship, leadership, and church growth.

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Using Bible Storytelling in Discipling Children

Using Bible Storytelling in Discipling Children

After being introduced to STS storytelling this past year, I thought I would try it out at home.  As part of family devotions each evening, I started doing something that I decided to call “Story Challenge.”  I pitched this to my son Joshua (5 years old) as a contest to see if he could tell back to me the story that I was about to tell him.   The first story we did was Jesus calming the storm in Mark 4:35-41.  We told and retold the story many times over several days.  He was hesitant to tell it back to me initially, claiming that it was too hard and that he didn’t remember anything.  So, I skipped straight to the walk through, coaxing out of him the next line of the story, bit by bit.  Often times, I throw in silly options and questions that provoke a “You’re wrong, Daddy!” type of response.  After I “bungle” the story, he tells me how the story was supposed to go.

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Unbiblical Preaching - Part 7: Solutions

Unbiblical Preaching - Part 7: Solutions

Some people may think that unbiblical preaching is the preacher’s problem, not theirs.  However, Biblical preaching is more likely to occur in a congregation where not only the pastor, but also the people want solid Biblical teaching.  While a pastor has a big role in helping create such an atmosphere, he is only one piece in the puzzle.  If a growing number of people in a church are dissatisfied with moralism, allegory, and gnosticism from the pulpit, then it can push the pastor to up the bar.  And of course, the corollary is true as well.  If the congregation is not interested in hearing from God, but just wants a pick-me-up to help them get through the week, then it will be tempting for the preacher to go light on the Word of God, giving the people what they think they need.So how do we work towards seeing more Biblical preaching in our churches?  I’ve come up with a list of five solutions.  The list is not exhaustive, and I am sure there are other solutions that could be added.  However, if we are able to put into practice just these five, then it should go a long way in creating healthier Bible reading and preaching in our churches.

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Unbiblical Preaching - Part 5: Consequences

Unbiblical Preaching - Part 5: Consequences

Having surveyed three common forms of unbiblical preaching (moralistic, allegorical, & gnostic) in the previous three posts, I want to dedicate this post to the unintended consequences that result when Christians are fed a steady diet of this kind of preaching.I have have no doubt that the majority of preachers who give moralistic, allegorical, or gnostic sermons are well intentioned men who love God and are trying to help their listeners.  The majority of Thai pastors whom I have met are hard working, godly men who desire to see people come to faith in Christ and grow as disciples.  However, while many try to preach sermons that will help people, they often times miss the mark by failing to tell people what God wants them to know from the pages of Scripture.Undernourished SheepOne of the tragic results of unbiblical preaching is that God’s people fail to receive the nourishment they need from God’s Word.  As preachers try to give them something that will help them, they fail to give them what they really need.   A while back, my wife told me that a lady whom she is discipling refused to go to the Buddhist temple with her non-Christian boss.  She was not being asked to make merit or make offerings but merely accompany her.  This Christian woman refused, saying the temple is a wicked place and it is sinful for Christians to go there under any circumstances.  In this statement, she not only offended her boss but implied that any other Christians who went to a Buddhist temple under any circumstance would be sinning (It is not uncommon for Thai Christians to go to a temple for the funeral of a Buddhist relative or friend, but not participate in the Buddhist parts of the ceremony).

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Unbiblical Preaching - Part 3: Allegorical Preaching

Unbiblical Preaching - Part 3: Allegorical Preaching

In my previous post, we looked at moralistic preaching and now we turn to the second of three common forms of unbiblical preaching - allegorical preaching. At a retreat for pastors and missionaries, we heard a sermon from a pastor who is serving on the leadership board for a certain Thai church denomination.  He preached on 1 Samuel 17 - the story of David and Goliath.  After the reading of the passage and giving a winding conversational introduction, he started going through the passage, telling us what was there in the story.  Each part of the story of David and Goliath was used allegorically to emphasize some spiritual or practical truth that is needed in order to be successful in ministry.  

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Unbiblical Preaching - Part 1: Missing the Point

Unbiblical Preaching - Part 1: Missing the Point

I’ve lived in Thailand for about five years and have heard a fair share of preaching in Thai churches.  I’ve heard local pastors in small congregations, specially invited preachers at large evangelistic events, and top church leaders at national gatherings.  And while there are some fine godly men preaching good Biblical sermons, the majority of preaching that I’ve heard in Thai churches has been very disappointing.  It’s not that they don’t use the Bible.  They do.  It is not that they are preaching blatant heresy.  They are not.  More often than not, I find sermons to be disappointing not because of what is there, but what is not there.

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M'Cheyne Bible Reading Calendar in Thai

M'Cheyne Bible Reading Calendar in Thai

DOWNLOAD PDF - M'CHEYNE BIBLE READING CALENDAR IN THAI

พีดีแอฟ - แผนการอ่านพระคริสตธรรมคัมภีร์ (โดย ศจ. โรเบิร์ท เมอร์เรย์ มเชย์น)

 

Perhaps my favorite Bible reading plan is the one put together by Robert Murray M'Cheyne.  In one year, M'Cheyne's Bible reading calendar takes you through the Old Testament once, and the Psalms and New Testament twice.  Each day has about four chapters of Scripture to read - usually two Old Testament readings, and then either two New Testament readings or a New Testament reading and a Psalm.  It is a rigorous regiment to keep up with but I really enjoy keeping my mind in various parts of the Bible at the same time, and it is a great aid in not getting bogged down in books like Leviticus since there are other, perhaps more accessible, daily readings to go along with it.  

 

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The Peculiar Conversion of Nān Inta, the First Christian in Northern Thailand

The Peculiar Conversion of Nān Inta, the First Christian in Northern Thailand

Everyone who becomes a Christian has a unique story.   The ultimate cause of salvation is God convicting a person of sin and graciously turning their heart to himself so that they might exercise faith and repentance.  However, the secondary reasons that people are initially attracted to the Gospel are much more varied.  For some people, a crisis in their life leads them to reach out for help.  For others, they are impressed by the love and welcome of the Christian community.  And still others have burning questions about the origin and meaning of life.  One of the most unique and peculiar accounts that I have encountered is the story of Nān Inta, the first convert in the ministry of Daniel McGilvary.  Regarded widely as the Father of the Church in Northern Thailand, McGilvary gives the following account in his autobiography:

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A Brief Survey of Thai Bible Translations

A Brief Survey of Thai Bible Translations

Last Updated July 2012

From time to time, I have been asked by new missionaries which Thai Bible translation they should buy?  There are not that many available but for the newcomer to Thailand, and to the Thai language, it can be confusing to know which Bible is best to get.  Therefore, for the sake of those who are new to Thailand, or are interested in Bible translations in general, I wanted to give a brief survey of what’s available.

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Creeds & Confessions of Faith

Creeds & Confessions of Faith

Confessions of faith, creeds, and catechisms have largely fallen into disuse among evangelical Protestant churches.  They are still around and used regularly in some churches but by and large have fallen by the wayside as many believers and churches have put more emphasis on experience and just loving Jesus.  Or some have claimed that "we have no creed but the Bible" but as soon as you say "I believe that the Bible teaches such and such" you have made a summary statement about Biblical teaching.  Such a summary is in essence a creed or confession. No statement of faith ever takes the place of the Bible but it can be a good tool to help people get an overview of what the Bible teaches and learning how to express what we believe the Bible teaches. Some confessions or creeds are better than others but a good one should contain nothing that can't be fairly clearly deduced from Scripture.  Along these lines, I wanted to share a brief story from the autobiography of Daniel McGilvary, pioneer missionary to Northern Thailand:

 

"In May 1876, Nan Inta was ordained our first ruling elder.  The story has oft been told that before his ordination the [Westminster] Confession of Faith was give him to read carefully, since he would be asked whether he subscribed to its doctrines.  When he had finished the reading, he remarked that he saw nothing peculiar in its teachings.  It was very much like what he had read in Paul's epistles!" (Daniel McGilvary, "A Half Century among the Siamese and Lao: An Autobiography", Fleming H. Revell Company, New York, 1912, p.169-170)